Shellfish harvest closure expands

Uncategorized

Recreational harvest of shellfish is closed on all Whatcom County beaches, including popular local beaches at Drayton Harbor and Birch Bay. The closure is due to the elevated presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning – a toxin that cannot be cooked out of clams, mussels, oysters, or scallops and can be deadly if consumed.

Tribe’s cannabis retailer celebrates its first year

Uncategorized

Between the Ferns Cannabis Company, owned and operated by the Nooksack Indian Tribe in Deming, Washington, is celebrating one year in business. It is the first tribally owned cannabis shop to open in Whatcom County. Located just off Mount Baker Highway, behind the Nooksack Market Center, Between the Ferns opened one year ago on June 21, 2021. Between the Ferns was a long-time dream of many tribal members who are passionate about bringing the health and wellness benefits cannabis and CBD can offer to the community. The company’s Board of Directors was formed in late 2020 and is composed of Nooksack Tribal members and Tribal Leadership. The Nooksack Indian Tribe is proud of the leadership team that opened the dispensary in such a short amount of time. This business entity helps to provide a tax base to the tribe, as well as an additional revenue stream to help support tribal programs. The dispensary also employs eight people, many of whom are Nooksack Tribal members. “We are extremely proud of the hard work that went into opening the doors in 2021. Since then, the store has grown in popularity as we continue to approach marketing and sales efforts in innovative andRead More

Date changed for July Tribal Council meeting

Tribal Council

Because Tribal offices will be closed July 4-5 in observance of Independence Day, the regularly scheduled monthly Council meeting has been rescheduled for Thursday, July 7. The meeting time and location are unchanged.

Shellfish harvest closed

Natural Resources

Recreational harvest of shellfish is closed from Sandy Point to the Canadian border, including popular local beaches at Drayton Harbor and Birch Bay. The closure is due to the elevated presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning – a toxin that cannot be cooked out of clams, mussels, oysters, or scallops and can be deadly if consumed. For more information: https://fortress.wa.gov/doh/biotoxin/biotoxin.html or 1-800-562- 5632

College offering application, registration help

Education

The Nooksack Education Department and Northwest Indian College Student Support Services are partnering to offer help with college applications, registration, and more at the Tribe’s Timber Ridge facility next week. Thinking about college but don’t know where to start? This is an opportunity to ask questions and learn how to fulfill your dream of pursuing a college degree! The event will also offer support for current students and returning students who previously left college before finishing a degree program. The Tribe will also offer assistance at the event with Siamscha Scholarship applications. To reserve a one-on-one counseling session for any of these services, contact Jamie Johnson at (360) 966-2043 or Jaime.Johnson@nooksack-nsn.gov.

Tribe to offer summer meal service for youth

Education

School is almost out, so it’s time to plan for summer – and that includes nutrition! The Nooksack Indian Tribe Summer Youth Program has received U.S. Department of Agriculture sponsorship for its Summer Food Service Program. Through the program, meals are available at no charge to children 18 years of age and younger from July 5 to August 26. The program will offer breakfast from 9-9:30 a.m. and lunch noon-1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays at Timber Ridge, 5604 Mission Road. For more information, contact Youth Program Manager Dean Ollinger at 360-966-9696.

Sunday deadline for WSU Native youth program

Education, Uncategorized

Washington State University is accepting applications until midnight on June 5 for its summer NY’EHE camp for Native youth. The camp is hosted by WSU Native American Programs and will run June 27-July 1 at WSU’s Pullman campus. The college provides all supplies needed for the camp. and all expenses are covered except transportation to and from the campus. The NY’EHE (Native Youth Exploring Higher Education) camp is for incoming high school students. During the program, students stay in WSU residence halls and participate in a variety of STEAM and college exploration activities. Each day is filled with academic, social, and light physical activities. Students will learn from WSU faculty, staff, students, and cultural guests. The application, available online, must be completed by both the student and their parent(s)/guardian(s). Participants must be vaccinated against COVID-19.